Freeware – SharePoint Security Scanner

Just want to the app?

Download here: http://spsecurityscanner.codeplex.com

I recently was at a client doing an audit on the SharePoint environment, and the question of how to do continual scanning on the site for possible system/ web service / and list WebForm exposure. Mimicking and automating this behavior is no big deal, since you are essentially just dispatching requests to various static URLs. The SPList object SPFormCollections can be exposed through the SPList.Forms property, and via web services rather than using the Forms web service you are sorta relegated learning on the SPList content type methods to get access to all customized forms. The SPWeb related ones are better to keep in a mutable file that can be managed.

So da da da! Here is a simple SharePoint security scanner. The composition of the application is actually pretty straightforward; it’s only about three forms. To abstract SharePoint explicit reference requirements the OM and web service assemblies are dynamically loaded at runtime so that SharePoint references are only required when doing OM connection types. Web service ones it shouldn’t really matter.

There are about three steps to get it going:

Start the application:

Click Open Connection:

And choose the connection type, and credential specifications:

When done hit connect, and you will return to the main form. Fill in whether you want to iterate SPList objects:

You can manage the web related urls, since the SPFormCollections are automated, through the Manage Web Inclusion List:

Scan the site, then you can view the results:

 

So it’s not very fancy, but gets the job done. Have hacky SharePoint fun!

 

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AccountManagement, PrincipalContext, Principals, And Performance

Often times in trivial AD operations using the *.AccountManagement namespace there is a performance hit in comparison to using ASQ approaches. This has been pretty frustrating to me in the past, as detailed here. In my journeys with these objects though I have determined a better approach. Let’s take the examples from the previous post two methods, GetUser and Get Group. To make these more efficient, we are going to use a combination of PrincipalContext, *Principal, and PrincipalSearcher objects along with a materialized Dictionary object in order to speed things up a bit.

Enough with the filler, let’s look at some code. What we are going to do is create a new PrincipalContext (the static method to hydrate this is discussed in the aforementioned post), then create a new *Principal object consuming the hydrated PrincipalContext in the constructor. The *Principal object will subsequently use the SamAccountName property with a wild card as a search parameter. This *Principal object is then passed into the constructor of a new PrincipalSearcher object so the principal search results can be returned using stuff like FindAll and FindOne. Once the PrincipalSearcher is well formed, we execute a FindAll, ToList to a strongly typed collection with IQueryable support, which allows us to execute a Where clause. The clause leveraged a Regular Expression (ala Regex.IsMatch), and the results are collated in a Dictionary(Of TKey, TValue) according to a specified key selector function. Once the Dictionary is built, a simple if clause is inserted which allows us to find, and return, the object we want! Comparative times of query have shown this cuts down on query time BY 5 TIMES!!!!!!! 

Firstly, the modified GetUser method:

[csharp]

public static UserPrincipal GetUser(string userName)
{
UserPrincipal userPrincipal = null;
SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(() =>
{
PrincipalContext principalContext = GetUserPrincipalContext();
var search = new UserPrincipal(principalContext);
search.SamAccountName = userName + ‘*’;
var ps = new PrincipalSearcher(search);
var pr = ps.FindAll().ToList().Where(a =>
Regex.IsMatch(a.SamAccountName, String.Format(@”{0}\D”, userName))).
ToDictionary(a => a.SamAccountName);
pr.Add(userName, Principal.FindByIdentity(principalContext, IdentityType.SamAccountName, userName));
if (pr.ContainsKey(userName))
{
userPrincipal = (UserPrincipal)pr[userName];
}
});
return userPrincipal;
}

[/csharp]

And the GetGroup method:

[csharp]

public static GroupPrincipal GetGroup(string groupName)
{
GroupPrincipal groupPrincipal = null;
SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(() =>
{
PrincipalContext principalContext = GetGroupPrincipalContext();
var search = new GroupPrincipal(principalContext);
search.SamAccountName = groupName + ‘*’;
var ps = new PrincipalSearcher(search);
var pr = ps.FindAll().ToList().Where(a =>
Regex.IsMatch(a.SamAccountName, String.Format(@”{0}\D”, groupName))).
ToDictionary(a => a.SamAccountName);
pr.Add(groupName, Principal.FindByIdentity(principalContext, IdentityType.SamAccountName, groupName));
if (pr.ContainsKey(groupName))
{
groupPrincipal = (GroupPrincipal) pr[groupName];
}
});
return groupPrincipal;
}

[/csharp]

The first thing you should notice is that these could be placed in a static method of the PrincipalContext as an extension, which would be a whole lot more succint, but I was just happy I got it to work. I’ll leave that up to someone else.

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